Stripy Animals

After seeing seven snakes on the last visit to our herping spot we were pretty sure we wouldn’t see as much wildlife on our latest visit, but once again our spot suprised us.

Not long into our walk we almost stumbled upon this Malayan Banded Wolf Snake (Lycodon subcintus), literally. It was right on the path and didn’t move until we were right by it. Once it did move though it didn’t stop which made it very difficult to get any decent photos, but Carly did manage to snap a couple before it disappeared for good.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThat rock in the picture above is proving to be quite lucky for us, so far we’ve found 4 species of snake on or around it (within 4m of it).

This night looked like it was going to be a night for stripy creatures as I spotted this tiny Bridle Snake (Dryocalamus davisonii). not long after….OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA Like the mock viper from our previous visit, this snake looked like a juvenile as it was about 20-30cm long (they can grow to 92cm). The thing that really struck me about this snake was how impossibly thin it was. It was thinner than a pencil, I even wondered, was it even as thick as a 3-4 strands of spaghetti together?

We didn’t see any more snakes that evening but there was still lots of cool wildlife to find. There were lots of vibrant moths about again and we even saw the same saturnid moth from the previous visit in exactly the same spot. d.jpgOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThere were still more stripy animals to be found and clinging upside down to a tree as they usually do was a young Intermediate Bow Fingered Gecko (Cryodactylus intermedius).OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWe were almost back to the car on our return journey when we decided to check out a different area by the stream. I was walking through the stream looking into the overhanging vegetation when I notcied a long stripy creature dangling down from a branch……another snake?

I waded towards the branch and discovered that the dangling shape was a tail, a chinese water dragon’s tail. Even better than discovering the water dragon was finding out that there were two on the same branch!OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAAnother successsful night, full of stripy creatures, and another species of snake that we haven’t seen before!

I’ve started keeping a journal of our adventures. I am recording the weather conditions, the state of the location where we see them, the species we see, their size, the elevation of the spot, and some other information that I can’t remember off the top of my head!

I’m hoping that one day, after a few hundred more herping adventures, I will be able to use the data to find patterns in terms of the species behaviour, locations and the weather conditions that they prefer.

We have already noticed one trend. A lot of the snakes and lizards we’ve been seing are juveniles, hopefully this means that there is a good population of breeding adults in the area and that in the months to come we will still be seeing lots of snakes as the juveniles grow up. What a privilege to live where we do, in such close proximity to nature in it’s most raw and beautiful state. I hope that you enjoy looking at the pictures half as much as we enjoy capturing them!

Remember to check out the other cool snakes and creatures we saw on our previous visit here

While you’re on the site, why not stick around and have a nose through some of the older posts on there? I really do value your comments and would love to hear your animal photo requests………..if they live in Thailand, I’d love to try and find them for you!

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